IIT Delhi researchers develop national map of areas most vulnerable to rainfall-induced soil erosion

Researchers at IIT Delhi have developed a map that identifies the regions in India that are most susceptible to soil erosion caused by rainfall with the aim of assisting in the planning and implementation of watershed development activities to reduce soil erosion.

The map was developed by PhD student Ravi, Professor Manabendra Sahari and Professor Sumida Chakma from the Institute’s Department of Civil Engineering.

“This study is a step towards building a national soil erosion model for India. The national rainfall erosion map will facilitate watershed managers to identify the potential for rainfall erosion in diverse locations, and thus plan, prioritize and implement primary watershed development activities to reduce soil erosion, Sahara said.

In Delhi, soil erosion map The areas most susceptible to soil erosion caused by rainfall are in Assam and Meghalaya which contain mostly clay soils, loams, sandy loams, sandy loams and sloping terrains.

The areas most susceptible to soil erosion caused by rainfall are in Assam and Meghalaya which contain mostly clay soils, loams, sandy loams, sandy loams and sloping terrain.

The area most susceptible to rain erosion is in the Laitknsew and Cherrapunji districts on the East Khasi Hills of Meghalaya. The least vulnerable is found in the Mount Shahi Kangri area of ​​Ladakh.

A large proportion of the total eroded soil in India is caused by water erosion, and rainfall erosion is one of the major components. However, current assessments of rainfall erosion in India are largely based on rain gauge recordings and surveys which impede their estimation and understanding of large areas,” explains the summary of their study published in the journal CATENA.

“This is the first nationwide assessment of rainfall erosion over India using networked rainfall datasets, which will help in understanding and mitigating rainfall erosion,” he adds.

The map was developed using multiple datasets including hourly time scale Indian monsoon data collection and analysis (IMDAA), daily scale Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) data, global climate hazard array, and infrared precipitation with station data ( CHIRPS) on a daily scale.

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