Freemantle to Pinnacles Desert; five popular day trips from Perth | Travel

The entry point to Australia from the West, Perth is the capital of Western Australia, the largest state in the nation. On the edge of the Indian Ocean, this western metropolis of less than two million people is regularly ranked among the ten most inhabited and attractive cities in the world. Life here moves at a very quiet pace, soaking under the eternal canopy of the blue sky. (Also Read: Byron Bay: Australian Serenity To Recharge Your Senses)

Like any other world city, Perth has many things to do and see. Popular with locals and tourists alike is the enchanting silhouette of the riverfront from Elizabeth Bay, capturing the rich architecture of the century-old colonial buildings, taking a picnic at King’s Park – the world’s largest inner-city green sanctuary, the bell tower. A glimpse of the city, appreciating street art and watching some of Australia’s finest ocean sunsets from the city’s numerous white sand beaches. Visiting art galleries and museums should not be underestimated.

There are so many wonderful places outside the city limits that deserve attention. Below are five of them that are worth a day trip from Perth.

Fremantle

Fremantle Prison is one of the significant cultural attractions of Western Australia. (Sandeep Hor)
Fremantle Prison is one of the significant cultural attractions of Western Australia. (Sandeep Hor)

Commonly referred to as the Old Town of Perth, the port settlement Fremantle is considered one of the world’s most eclectic and lively beach neighborhoods. Just 20km from Perth is easily accessible by bus, ferry and train, home to one of the oldest public buildings in Western Australia and one of the best preserved models of the 19th century maritime road. This is the perfect place to spend a day exploring the history of criminally-built heritage sites that are now home to museums, galleries, pubs and stores.

The Round House, the oldest building in the state, and a prison built by criminals in the 1850s, are not to be missed. Fans of marine history visit the Maritime Museum and Shiprex Museum, and art lovers visit or walk through the Fremantle Arts Center. The street art that adorns the walls and fences, with some having fun in mind, the beaches go off to mingle with the sea and sand. Those interested in food and wine will end up on the cappuccino strip, viewing fishing boats returning after dawn and sampling fresh seafood at Alfresco Road or Fishing Boat Harbor with cafes, eateries, bars and microbreweries.

Rattnest Island

A breathtaking view of Rottenest Island (Sandeep Hoar)
A breathtaking view of Rottenest Island (Sandeep Hoar)

When it is sunny and sunny, many Perth residents rush to the island of Rottnest and call it a day of sunshine and nature. Although they appeal to 17th-century Dutch explorer Willem de Wlamming as rats or ‘rats’ in Dutch, they look like small wallabies. So they named it Rottnest Island – a nest for rots. It can be reached by Fremantle by boat, which is not large in size, only 19 square kilometers.

The isolated beaches, scenic bays, many coral reefs, colorful underwater scenery and shipwreck are ideal for those who love playing with water. There are many places that are ideal for scuba diving, snorkeling, swimming or sleeping in the sand. The best way to tour the island is by bike or segway, but there are bus tours around the island that are only 11 km long and 4.5 km wide. The island has some beautiful historic buildings and lighthouses.

Desert of Pinnacles

Pinnacle Desert (Sandeep Hoar)
Pinnacle Desert (Sandeep Hoar)

Traveling less than three hours north from Perth along the coast of the Indian Ocean, the Pinnacles Desert within the Nambung National Park presents a scenario in which many agree that there is nothing on earth. The desert landscape is generously crushed with thousands of massive peak-shaped limestone columns. Each of them is unique, representing different structural forms and shapes. Some are sharp and toothed, sharp-edged to a point that still resembles gravestones reaching a height of 5 m. Visitors have been on the lookout for a look at how the natural forces of water and air have fortified peaks from the Seychelles for millions of years. This is undoubtedly a sight to behold.

These carved patterns of nature were made from seashells of limestone in a bygone era rich in marine life. Divided into lime-rich sands, the shells were brought ashore by waves and transported inland by the wind to form mobile mounds, which eventually led to these exotic molds with a combination of rotting herbs, rain and air erosion. According to geologists, this complex process continues to form new peaks even today. Many people visit this natural wonder at sunset, enjoying the surreal beauty of the color-changing nature as the sun disappears to the horizon.

Margaret River Area

Margaret River underground caves (Sandeep Hoar)
Margaret River underground caves (Sandeep Hoar)

The Margaret River is one of the nation’s largest wineries, with more than 200 vineyards, producing more than 25 percent of Australia’s premium wine. Although synonymous with wine, the area in the southwest of the state is home to many ancient beaches, high wooden curry forests, famous surf breaking points, kangaroo dotted fields, and limestone formations of various shapes. Forms.

The beautiful 2.5-hour drive from Perth is the start of an area stretching from the small town of Baselton, known for its long wooden jetty to Cape Levine, where the Indian Ocean meets the Southern Ocean. Cape Levine’s location also marks Australia’s most southwestern point and is marked by the presence of a historic lighthouse, which is said to be the largest in the nation. Crawling through some famous wineries, breweries and basement doors on a day trip, you can cover all of these iconic sites.

Wave Rock

Wave Rock (Sandeep Hoar)
Wave Rock (Sandeep Hoar)

The stunning coastline of Western Australia attracts surfers worldwide, but its biggest tide rises from the vast plains – no ocean in sight. This is Wave Rock – a natural rock formation that resembles a tidal ocean wave. 300 km southeast of Perth, it is about 15 m high and 110 m long in dimensions. This smooth sloping structure has generated much interest from the general public and geologists for decades. In geological terms, it is actually a granite Inselberg, like Australia’s famous Uluru rock, created by 2.7 billion years of wind and rainwater erosion. Visitors surf the tide from dawn to dusk, the stunning colors of ancient granite providing the perfect photographic backdrop for their adventure.

Wave Rock’s epic grandeur is mind-blowing, but the mundane encounter continues in the nearby Mulka Cave, where a collection of over 450 ancient rock paintings tell the fascinating story of the legend of local Aborigines. The area around Wave Rock is known for its stunning wildflower display, which is bright from September to December.

Sandeep Hoar is an international travel writer and photographer based in Australia

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